A different way to cook a steak…


I recently read something similar to this, and have yet to try it.  My usual method is to get it as dark as possible without overcooking it, but this seems to make sense.  In the new-American style of steakhouses, its rare to see a charbroil, or any black at all on the meat, to avoid the bitterness.  I think I may be stopping off on my way home for a ribeye or two…

Reposted from ideas in food.

There is nothing like a good steak. My sweet tooth blossomed with pregnancy, and I enjoyed desserts in a way that I haven’t in years. I abhorred fish in any form except for a desperate craving for raw oysters and french fries, still unsatisfied as a matter of fact, that I sidestepped with fried oysters because I just wasn’t willing to risk raw seafood during gestation. Anyway I digress, I’m talking about cravings and the only constant before, during and after pregnancy is my craving for a good steak. It hits periodically and although the actual steak may change with what’s available, the desire for properly cooked red meat never seems to vary.

PrimeStripLoin

A great steak needs nothing else. The potatoes, spinach, salad, etc are simply decoration. They may be delicious on their own but beside a beautifully cooked piece of beef they seem to fade into the woodwork, taking up space in my stomach that could be filled with meat. I still stand by a simple cast iron pan, lightly coated with salt and heated till it just begins to smoke. Drop in a thick steak, lower the heat to medium, and turn often. I got this technique (the continuous flipping of the meat) from Harold McGee ten years ago and never looked back. Constant turning not only cooks the meat more quickly and evenly, it helps develop a beautiful, even caramelization on both sides of the steak. Let the beef rest on a warm plate topped with some good butter, pour a glass of decadent red wine, and then enjoy. The meat develops an almost crisp salty crust, giving way to the rich meat and mineral-ly juices. There’s nothing else quite like it. The dry aged prime steaks pictured here are from our local Whole Foods (local being a relative term as it’s in Princeton, NJ), our most recent go-to butcher, and they were delicious. Take my word for it.

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~ by Chest Rockaway on May 3, 2010.

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